Books Health, Family & Lifestyle The Persuaders: The Hidden Industry That Wants To Change Your Mind

The Persuaders: The Hidden Industry That Wants To Change Your Mind.pdf

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Read online or download a free book: The Persuaders: The Hidden Industry That Wants To Change Your Mind

Pages: 304

Language: English

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd (8 Dec. 2016)

By: James Garvey(Author)

Book format: pdf doc docx mobi djvu epub ibooks (*An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose.)

'A work of engaging pop philosophy and accessible social science [and] a boisterous dissection of the forces jellifying our minds' Sunday Times

Includes brand new material covering the US election and Brexit

Every day, many people will try to change your mind, but they won’t reason with you. Instead, you’ll be nudged, anchored, incentivised and manipulated in barely noticeable ways. It’s a profound shift in the way we interact with one another. 

Philosopher James Garvey explores the hidden story of persuasion and the men and women in the business of changing our minds. From the covert PR used to start the first Gulf War to the neuromarketing of products to appeal to our unconscious minds, he reveals the dark arts practised by professional persuaders.

How did we end up with a world where beliefs are mass-produced by lobbyists and PR firms? Could Google or Facebook swing elections? Are new kinds of persuasion making us less likely to live happy, decent lives in an open, peaceful world?Is it too late, or can we learn to listen to reason again? The Persuaders is a call to think again about how we think now.

'A work of engaging pop philosophy and accessible social science [and] a boisterous dissection of the forces jellifying our minds' * Sunday Times * 'Fierce and timely'. * Daily Mail * 'Garvey doesn't pull any punches.' * New Scientist * `The author worries, rightly, that in losing the ability to argue and question intelligently we become more susceptible to the subtle and unseen skills of powerful persuaders.'Financial Times


Read online or download a free book: The Persuaders: The Hidden Industry That Wants To Change Your Mind.pdf

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Customer reviews:

  • By Rippa700 on 8 October 2016

    How much and how easily we are manipulated is fascinating and worrying, and for sure we would live in a better world if there were controls on this skilled marketing. But Garvey's notion is right that we should all be taught to reason and that it will take the power of the masses to change anything. Good book.

  • By J Bakewell on 17 August 2017

    I enjoyed this book. It is a fairly light read, not really going too heavily into any particular topic, so it's a good primer. It is the kind of book everyone should read because everyone should be aware of how their opinions can be altered by the various influences in our world.The book outlines various ways people are nudged or persuaded in contemporary society, including advertising, mass media, and psychology. I found the most interesting sections were the ones about PR companies and their influence on mass media, public opinion and politics. Their reach and influence is immense and nearly always work to endorse corporate interests.After reading this book I have become more aware of how similar people's political arguments are.

  • By Mr Smith on 1 June 2017

    This is a very interesting book.The author is a clever guy who noticed that other people often deliberately ignore logic, dismiss evidence, chose to believe what they want to believe and carry on regardless as before.Many engineers, scientists, philosophers etc will say "So, whats new", but this author did some serious research and then wrote a whole book about why he thinks people behave this way ..... and, more importantly, why other people want them to and how they encourage them to.There are other books on the topic, but this author has written a very readable and very convincing book.

  • By Elisabeth :) on 5 September 2017

    There's quite a lot I already knew here but not everyone is a Politics graduate. There are also some contentious claims but generally it is wise to get these issues out in the open. Those who want to persuade others have their work cut out with people like me, especially when they rely on machine learning. A computer can only work with information it is programmed to use. We don't all fit cosily into groups based on things like comments or likes on Facebook, or what we re-tweet. We get advertising for things we don't want or even for things we've never heard of. Much the same works with all sorts of information.

  • By David J. Boggis on 13 May 2016

    For a heavy subject, this is a page-turner... except when it isn't, which is to say that occasionally the writing gets stodgy, which is why I've limited this to four stars, not five. Essential reading for any journalist or, in fact, any halfway intelligent consumer.

  • By N. Nunes on 3 May 2017

    A Gripping page turner about the cognitive weaknesses and emotional trigger points we have that experts are secretly exploiting to manipulate and change our minds - getting us to spend money we don't have and vote in ways we didn't plan to. A must read. The first ten pages are overly dense and slightly hard to follow but once the book gets into its stride it is simply hard to put down. I'm wiser for reading it.

  • By daniel robinson on 6 May 2017

    This is a really well written and interesting look at how we perceive things and how we think we do, as you read through this book you realise (some of it you knew all along) how controlled we all are whilst thinking we make our own minds up.

  • By John H. on 23 August 2017

    although it struggles to be persuasive, I thought it was a reference to the old Tony Curtis and Roger Moore tv programme.

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